Dr Robert John Gallichan

BE(Hons), PhD

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Research Fellow

Biography

Robert Gallichan graduated from the University of Auckland with a Bachelor of Engineering in Electrical and Electronic Engineering in 2013. He completed his PhD thesis in Biomedical Engineering in August 2016 at the Auckland Bioengineering Institute under the supervision of Associate Professors David Budgett and Dr Daniel McCormick. His PhD project focused on using integrated circuits to develop miniature systems for wirelessly transferring power to implantable devices under changing loads and coupling conditions. 

 

Research | Current

Research group

Implantable Devices
Robert's research is focused on developing methods to transfer power and bidirectional data to small, low power implants deep within the body. Transmiting power though inductive coupling incolves using a coil outside the body to generate a magnetic field and a small coil implanted within the body to pick up part of the field converting it to an electric current. The same magnetic field can be used to transfer data in and out of the body.

Beacause magnetic field strength decreases rapidly with the coil seperation a key challange is supplying enough power to the implant. This is exagerated by the small proportion of magnetic field picked up by a small implant coil. Data transfer out of the body is also difficult fo the same reasons. 

These challanges are being adressed by developing small, low power integrated circuits that require very little power and use novel strategies to transmit data out of the body.  

Distinctions/Honours

2015 Spark $100k Challenge Winner - Uniservices Research Commercialisation Prize

2015 Spark $100k Challenge Finalist

BreathHero is about developing a novel chest physiotherapy (CPT) device for children that uses sensors and gaming technology to make CPT a motivating and entertaining experience. With Hamed Minaeizaeim.


2015 Spark Ideas Challenge Winner - Commercial Entrepreneurship category

GCP technology: New “chest physiotherapy” device that motivates children to exercise and records their performance so doctors can monitor the progression of their lung diseases. With Hamed Minaeizaeim.

 

 

Selected publications and creative works (Research Outputs)